Ray Edinger

Biography

Author Ray Edinger was born in Upstate New York and raised on Long Island. He studied at the Rochester Institute of Technology where he earned his bachelors degree. Following graduation, he spent the next thirty-six years as a scientist in the field of photographic and imaging science with the Eastman Kodak Company and then with Heidelberg Digital.

Ray is an avid collector of rare eighteenth- and nineteenth-century books on exploration in the Arctic. His collecting interest ultimately expanded to speaking engagements and authorship, with articles in Mercator's World and Western New York Heritage and he has contributed to the PBS NOVA presentation "Arctic Passage: Trials on the Ice." He has published on his book collecting experience and its relation to Arctic exploration in Biblio and Journal of the Fellowship of American Bibliophilic Societies. His lectures on Arctic history include speaking engagements at the Westport (Mass.) Historical Society and the Bibliophile Society of Rochester (N.Y.). Besides publishing in the Arctic and book-collecting genres, Ray has also published in a variety of technical journals: Compendium; Imaging Technology; Applied Optics; Imaging Science; International Journal of Climatology; and Headache, the Journal of Head and Face Pain.

Now retired from his scientific endeavors, Ray is occupied not only with his writing and bibliophilic interests but also with travel and has visited more than sixty countries around the globe. He lives with his wife and fellow traveling companion Yvonne in Rochester, New York. Ray is President Emeritus of the Bibliophile Society of Rochester where he was a Trustee of the Fellowship of American Bibliophilic Societies. In 2003 Ray received the Bibliophile Society's "Book Person-of-the-Year Award" in recognition of his significant contributions to the Rochester book scene. For ten years he served as editor of the Genesee Valley Chapter of the New York Civil Liberties Union newsletter.

Selected Works

Now in Print!
A true story of romance, adventure, and tragedy in the nineteenth century.
A skillfully retold absorbing epic of early Arctic exploration.
--Publishers Weekly